Category Archives: Museums & Exhibits

New-York Historical Society Exhibition Honors Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg

The New-York Historical Society honors the late Ruth Bader Ginsburg (RBG)—the trailblazing Supreme Court justice and cultural icon—with a special exhibition on view October 1, 2021 – January 23, 2022, Notorious RBG: The Life and Times of Ruth Bader Ginsburg  © Karen Rubin/goingplacesfarandnear.com

The New-York Historical Society honors the late Ruth Bader Ginsburg (RBG)—the trailblazing Supreme Court justice and cultural icon—with a special exhibition this fall. On view October 1, 2021 – January 23, 2022, Notorious RBG: The Life and Times of Ruth Bader Ginsburg is based on the popular Tumblr and bestselling book of the same name. A traveling exhibition organized by the Skirball Cultural Center in Los Angeles, the show takes an expansive and engaging look at the justice’s life and work, highlighting her ceaseless efforts to protect civil rights and foster equal opportunity for all Americans.

In light of the extraordinary developments on the Supreme Court threatening to overturn Roe v. Wade with the breathtaking, unprecedented lightning-fast addition (even as voting for president was underway in 2020) of Amy Coney Barrett in place of Ruth Bader Ginsburg, and the threats to women’s reproductive and voting rights sweeping the nation,  this exhibit opening at the New-York Historical Society brings special significance on top of honoring the heralded Justice’s extraordinary life and legacy – a legacy that is being ripped apart with breakneck speed.

It has been all too easy to take for granted the rights won over the course of RBG’s trail-blazing life and fight, and it is important to be reminded of the way things were and could be again.

“It is a great honor that we celebrate Ruth Bader Ginsburg, a native New Yorker whose impact on the lives of contemporary Americans has been extraordinary,” said Dr. Louise Mirrer, president and CEO of New-York Historical. “Justice Ginsburg fought hard to achieve justice and equality for all, inspiring us with her courage and tenacity in upholding our fundamental American ideals. A special friend to New-York Historical, in 2018 she presided over a naturalization ceremony in our auditorium. The exhibition is a memorial tribute to her achievements and legacy.”

Notorious RBG features archival photographs and documents, historical artifacts, contemporary art, media stations, and gallery interactives spanning RBG’s varied roles as student, wife to Martin “Marty” Ginsburg, mother, lawyer, judge, women’s rights pioneer, and internet phenomenon. Highlights include a robe and jabot from RBG’s Supreme Court wardrobe; the official portraits of RBG and Sandra Day O’Connor—the first two women to serve on the Supreme Court—on loan from the National Portrait Gallery; and QR-code listening stations where visitors can hear RBG’s delivery of oral arguments, majority opinions, and forceful dissents in landmark Supreme Court cases on their own devices.

The exhibition also displays 3D re-imaginations of key places in RBG’s life—such as her childhood Brooklyn apartment; the kitchen in RBG and Marty’s home, with some of Marty’s favorite recipes and cooking utensils; and the Supreme Court bench and the desk in her chambers.

Personal materials range from home movies of RBG with Marty on their honeymoon and in the early years of their marriage to yearbooks from RBG’s academic life—from her Brooklyn high school to Harvard, Columbia, and Rutgers Universities—to a paper that she wrote as an eighth grader exploring the relationship between the Ten Commandments, the Magna Carta, the Bill of Rights, the Declaration of Independence, and the recently formed United Nations Charter.

Special to New-York Historical’s presentation are remembrances from RBG’s visit to the Museum in 2018 to officiate a naturalization ceremony of new citizens after she learned about New-York Historical’s Citizenship Project which teaches U.S. history and civics to green card holders, a video featuring a map and photographs of key places in her life as a New Yorker, and an overview of the memorials that cropped up around her hometown in the wake of her passing. As part of New-York Historical’s upcoming public program series, on December 8, Supreme Court expert Linda Greenhouse looks at where the courts stand following Justice Ginsburg’s death. Families can explore the exhibition with a specially created family guide, and themed story times will take place throughout the exhibition’s run.

After debuting at the Skirball Cultural Center in 2018, Notorious RBG: The Life and Times of Ruth Bader Ginsburg has toured the country and was on view at the Maltz Museum of Jewish Heritage in Cleveland, through August 29, 2021. After its New York run, the exhibition will travel to the Holocaust Museum Houston in Houston (March 2022) and the Capital Jewish Museum in Washington, D.C. (September 2022).

Notorious RBG: The Life and Times of Ruth Bader Ginsburg has been coordinated at New-York Historical by Valerie Paley, senior vice president and Sue Ann Weinberg Director, Patricia D. Klingenstein Library; Laura Mogulescu, curator of women’s history collections; and Anna Danziger Halperin, Andrew W. Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow in Women’s History and Public History, Center for Women’s History.

Lead sponsorship for Notorious RBG: The Life and Times of Ruth Bader Ginsburg at New-York Historical is provided by Weil, Gotshal & Manges LLP. Major sponsorship is provided by Northern Trust. Generous additional support is provided by Helen and Robert Appel and Bernard and Denise Schwartz. Exhibitions at New-York Historical are made possible by Dr. Agnes Hsu-Tang and Oscar Tang, the Saunders Trust for American History, the Evelyn & Seymour Neuman Fund, the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council, and the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Legislature. WNET is the media sponsor.

The Skirball Cultural Center is a place of meeting guided by the Jewish tradition of welcoming the stranger and inspired by the American democratic ideals of freedom and equality. The Skirball welcomes people of all communities and generations to participate in cultural experiences that celebrate discovery and hope, foster human connections, and calls upon everyone to help build a more just society.

New York City’s oldest museum, the New-York Historical Society Museum & Library was founded in 1804. The Patricia D. Klingenstein Library—one of the most distinguished in the nation—fosters research through its outstanding collections, which include more than 10 million items. The Museum presents groundbreaking history and art exhibitions as well as public programs that convey the stories of New York and the nation’s diverse populations to the broadest possible public.

The New-York Historical Society is located at 170 Central Park West at Richard Gilder Way (77th Street), New York, NY 10024. Information: (212) 873-3400. Website: nyhistory.org.

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New-York Historical Society Commemorates the 20th Anniversary of September 11 With Special Programs, Displays

The New-York Historical Society, the oldest museum in New York City, is commemorating the 20th anniversary of September 11 with displays of objects collected in the aftermath of the attacks and special programs taking place throughout the day on Saturday, September 11, 2021.

The New-York Historical Society, the oldest museum in New York City, is commemorating the 20th anniversary of September 11 with displays of objects collected in the aftermath of the attacks and special programs taking place throughout the day on Saturday, September 11, 2021.

ON VIEW

Remembering 9/11: On the morning of September 11, 2001, just 15 minutes after hearing the alarm, the FDNY’s elite Rescue Company 2—Lieutenant Peter Martin and firefighters William Lake, Daniel Libretti, John Napolitano, Lincoln Quappe, Kevin O’Rourke, and Edward Rall—arrived at the unfolding World Trade Center tragedy.  All seven were killed when the building collapsed. On special display is a damaged door of Rescue 2’s fire truck that is part of New-York Historical’s collection. 

Objects Tell Stories: 9/11: In the immediate aftermath of the attacks, New-York Historical launched the History Responds collecting program to document monumental events as they are happening. Explore objects from that initiative in our fourth floor permanent display, including a mangled Venetian blind retrieved from St. Paul’s Churchyard and a memorial of candles, notes, and mementos erected on Barclay Street.

PROGRAMS

Captioned videos related to 9/11 and the aftermath as well as images from here is new york, a photographic archive that documented the various aspects of Ground Zero, will be projected on digital displays in the Smith Gallery. In addition, a 25-minute cinematic experience with accompanying music will screen in the Robert H. Smith Auditorium on the hour and half hour, providing a quiet place for visitors to reflect.

From sundown on Friday, September 10, to sunrise on Sunday, September 12, New-York Historical’s facade will be lit up in “Memorial Blue,” as we join other cultural organizations across the city for the annual Tribute in Light.  

As part of New York City’s Key to NYC program, all visitors to New York City museums age 12 and over are required to be vaccinated against COVID-19. For more details, go to our FAQ page.

New York City’s oldest museum, the New-York Historical Society Museum & Library was founded in 1804. The Patricia D. Klingenstein Library—one of the most distinguished in the nation—fosters research through its outstanding collections, which include more than 10 million items. The Museum presents groundbreaking history and art exhibitions as well as public programs that convey the stories of New York and the nation’s diverse populations to the broadest possible public. 

The New-York Historical Society, 170 Central Park West at Richard Gilder Way (77th Street), New York, NY 10024, 212-873-3400, nyhistory.org.

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Virtual Walking Tours, 9/11 Tribute Concert Highlight Museum of Jewish Heritage’s Fall Programming

The Museum of Jewish Heritage, NYC, mounts an enriching line-up of in-person and virtual events, including virtual walking tours of historic Jewish sites and a 20th anniversary 9/11 tribute concert this fall © Karen Rubin/goingplacesfarandnear.com

(New York, NY)— This fall, the Museum of Jewish Heritage – A Living Memorial to the Holocaust will present an enriching line-up of in-person and virtual events, including virtual walking tours of historic Jewish sites, launches for four upcoming books about the Holocaust, and a twentieth anniversary 9/11 tribute concert with the Knickerbocker Chamber Orchestra. 

“This fall, we’re excited to present an array of programming that will allow our visitors to explore, learn, be entertained, and remember together,” says Museum President & CEO Jack Kliger. “Whether you join us virtually or in-person in our newly renovated Edmond J. Safra Hall, we look forward to offering programs that take you to another place and time and leave you with a new or deeper understanding of Jewish heritage and the Holocaust.”

All in-person events will also be livestreamed and available virtually for audiences around the world.

Fall Highlights include:

  • Virtual walking tours that highlight the Jewish history and neighborhoods of major European cities such as Budapest, Berlin, and Amsterdam (September 1 – October 17)
  • Book launches for four new nonfiction books that explore Holocaust history: “All the Frequent Troubles of Our Days,” “ We Share the Same Sky: A Memoir of Memory & Migration,” “Into the Forest: A Holocaust Story of Survival, Triumph, and Love,” and “What They Didn’t Burn: Uncovering My Father’s Holocaust Secrets” (August 31 – October 5)
  • A special 9/11 tribute concert with the Knickerbocker Chamber Orchestraon the 20th anniversary of the World Trade Center attacks (September 11) 

For more information and a full calendar of events, visit the Museum’s events page:

During in-person events, the Museum’s LOX at Café Bergson will be open for brunch, lunch, and

dinner, serving its Museum-made smoked salmon and other kosher delicacies.

Here are event details:

“All the Frequent Troubles of Our Days” Book Talk 

Tuesday, August 31, 2021 | 2:00 P.M. ET

(Virtual Event)

Mildred Harnack was an American activist who witnessed the rise of the Nazi Party in Germany and joined what would become the largest underground resistance group in Berlin as the only American in the leadership of the German resistance. She recruited working-class Germans into the resistance, helped Jews escape, plotted acts of sabotage, and collaborated in writing leaflets that denounced Hitler and called for revolution. When the first shots of the Second World War were fired, she became a spy, couriering top-secret intelligence to the Allies.  Harnack would eventually get captured and was sentenced to execution by Hitler and was beheaded. 

Join the Museum for a program exploring Harnack’s life and legacy with her great-great-niece Rebecca Donner, author of the newly-released book “All the Frequent Troubles of Our Days: The True Story of the American Woman at the Heart of the German Resistance to Hitler”

Virtual Walking Tour: Jewish Budapest 

Wednesday, September 1, 2021 | 11:00 A.M. ET

(Virtual Event)

Join the Museum and Our Travel Circle to discover the vibrant history and culture of Jewish Budapest. On this live, virtual walking tour, tour guide Adam will bring visitors through the heart of the historic Jewish quarter of Pest—one of Budapest city center’s most intriguing areas.

“We Share the Same Sky” Book Launch

Thursday, September 9, 2021 | 7:00 P.M. ET

(Virtual Event)

“We Share the Same Sky: A Memoir of Memory & Migration” documents Rachael Cerrotti’s decade-long journey to retrace her grandmother’s Holocaust survival story. The new memoir, scheduled for release in August 2021, explores the pursuit of memory and how the retelling of family stories becomes the history itself.

Join the Museum and Descendants of Holocaust Survivors (2G Greater New York)for a program celebrating the launch of We Share the Same Sky. Cerrotti, who is an award-winning photographer, writer, educator, and audio producer and the inaugural Storyteller in Residence for the USC Shoah Foundation, will be in conversation with Ellen Bachner Greenberg, co-founder of Descendants of Holocaust Survivors.

Remembrance, Reflection, Resilience: A 9/11 Tribute Concert 

Saturday, September 11, 2021 | 8:00 P.M. 

Edmond J. Safra Hall (In-Person Event)

The Museum of Jewish Heritage and the Knickerbocker Chamber Orchestra present a special concert to commemorate the twentieth anniversary of the events of September 11, 2001. Interspersed with readings of remembrance and reflection, the concert will feature Samuel Barber’s “Adagio for Strings,” the world premiere of Gary S. Fagin’s “9/11 In Memoriam,” Edward Kennedy (Duke) Ellington’s “Come Sunday” featuring the KCO’s Orlando Wells on violin, and other music of uplift and inspiration.

Virtual Walking Tour: Jewish Porto

Sunday, September 12, 2021 | 11:00 A.M. ET

(Virtual Event)

Join the Museum and Our Travel Circle for a live, virtual walking tour in the beautiful coastal city of Porto, Portugal.

Jews have lived in Porto since the 12th century, and the city’s Jewish population was an active part of its business and civic community in medieval times—until the Inquisition forced many into conversion or expulsion.

With our guide Sara, the walking tour will explore some of the old neighborhoods of the ancient Portuguese Sephardic Jews, turned into the boroughs of converted “New Christians.” We’ll also learn the exciting story of the rejuvenation of Porto’s Jewish community during the last century.

“Into the Forest” Book Launch 

Sunday, September 12, 2021 | 2:00 P.M. ET

Edmond J. Safra Hall (In-Person Event)

From a little-known chapter of Holocaust history, Rebecca Frankel’s “Into the Forest: A Holocaust Story of Survival, Triumph, and Love” (which will be published on September 7, 2021) is one family’s inspiring true story of love, escape, and survival.

In the summer of 1942, the Rabinowitz family narrowly escaped the Nazi ghetto in their Polish town by fleeing to the forbidding Bialowieza Forest. They miraculously survived two years in the woods―through brutal winters, Typhus outbreaks, and merciless Nazi raids―until they were liberated by the Red Army in 1944.

During the first ghetto massacre, Miriam Rabinowitz rescued a young boy named Philip by pretending he was her son. Nearly a decade later, a chance encounter at a wedding in Brooklyn would lead Philip to find the woman who saved him. And to discover her daughter Ruth was the love of his life.

Join the Museum for a program celebrating the launch of Into the Forest with Frankel and David Rothkopf, host of the Deep State Radio podcast and CEO of The Rothkopf Group. 

Stories Survive: Dr. Rene David Alkalay

Tuesday, September 14, 2021 | 2:00 P.M. ET

(Virtual Event) 

Dr. Rene David Alkalay was born in March 1941 in Zagreb, the capital of the former Yugoslavia (now Croatia). When Dr. Alkalay was just a few weeks old, Croatia became a puppet state of Nazi Germany and Fascist Italy, and his father and paternal relatives were imprisoned in a concentration camp run by the country’s new Ustaša regime. Later that year, Dr. Alkalay, his mother, and his maternal relatives were imprisoned in other Ustaša-run concentration camps, where they remained for two years.

After the camp was liberated, Dr. Alkalay hid in the forest with partisan groups for a year and then was airlifted out of Yugoslavia to a Displaced Persons camp in Italy. He spent four years after the war at a Catholic school in Rome, unaware of his true religious identity.

In 1950, Dr. Alkalay and his family emigrated to the United States, where he later became a psychotherapist, nutritionist, and pastoral counselor. Join the Museum for a program exploring Dr. Alkalay’s story of survival in Croatia.

“Truus’ Children” Screening and Discussion 

Sunday, September 26, 2021 | 2:00 P.M. ET

(Virtual Event)

In December 1938, Dutch social worker Truus Wijsmuller was invited to a meeting with Nazi official Adolf Eichmann regarding the transportation of Jewish children out of Nazi territory. With Eichmann’s permission, she quickly organized 600 Jewish children in Vienna and helped transport them to safety in England and the Netherlands. She then continued organizing transports for the next 18 months, becoming a central figure in the rescue network known as the Kindertransport. In total, the Kindertransport saved the lives of approximately 10,000 children.

Join the Museum and the Netherlands’ diplomatic network in the US for a virtual screening and discussion of Truus’ Children, a new film from Dutch filmmakers Pamela Sturhoofd and Jessica van Tijn exploring Wijsmuller’s remarkable legacy. As it tells Wijsmuller’s story, the film also probes the question of why Wijsmuller has been largely forgotten in the 75 years since the World War II.

This program will feature an exclusive panel discussion with Sturhoofd, van Tijn, and Ilse Bauer-Langsdorf, one of the children saved by Truus Wijsmuller. The discussion will be moderated by Michael Simonson, Head of Public Outreach and Archivist at the Leo Baeck Institute. 

Jewish Multiverse: Judaism and Superheroes

Thursday, September 30, 2021 | 7:00 P.M. ET

(Virtual Event)

Since the first Superman comic was published in 1938, there has been a persistent fascination with superheroes. Today, we see them everywhere: television, movies, comics, toys, and anywhere else one can think of. Jews have played an important role in superhero culture, both as characters and creators.

Join the Museum for a program exploring Jewish superheroes with comic book writer Marguerite Bennett (DC Bombshells) and editor Danny Fingeroth (Marvel’s Spiderman Comics Line). They will be in conversation with journalist Abraham Riesman, author of True Believer: The Rise and Fall of Stan Lee.

Powerhouse Jewish Women: Isle of Kiezbos & Stephanie Lynne Mason in Concert 

Sunday, October 3, 2021 | 3:00 P.M.

Edmond J. Safra Hall (In-Person Event)

Celebrate Jewish women’s music at this energetic Isle of Klezbos concert, held live in the Museum’s Edmond J. Safra Hall.

This soulful, fun-loving powerhouse all-women’s klezmer sextet has toured from Vienna to Vancouver since 1998. The band, led by drummer Eve Sicular, approaches tradition with irreverence and respect and is known for its tight yet adventurous sound, lush arrangements, luscious compositions, and solos that swing the Yiddish stratosphere. The band also includes Pam Fleming on trumpet,Reut Regev on trombone, Melissa Fogarty on vocals, Shoko Nagai on accordion and piano, and Saskia Lane on double bass.

Isle of Klezbos will be opened by Broadway actress and singer Stephanie Lynne Mason, known for her leading roles in Fiddler on the Roof and Fiddler on the Roof in Yiddish, accompanied by Bob Marks on piano.

“What They Didn’t Burn” Book Launch

Tuesday, October 5, 2021 | 7:00 P.M. ET

(Virtual Event)

Growing up, author Mel Laytner saw his father as a quintessential Type B: passive and conventional. As he uncovered documents the Nazis didn’t burn, however, another man emerged—a black market ringleader and wily camp survivor who made his own luck. The tattered papers also shed light on painful secrets his father took to his grave.

Melding the intimacy of personal memoir with the rigors of investigative journalism, “What They Didn’t Burn: Uncovering My Father’s Holocaust Secrets” is a heartwarming, inspiring story of resilience and redemption. A story of how desperate survivors turned hopeful refugees rebuilt their shattered lives in America, all the while struggling with the lingering trauma that has impacted their children to this day.

Join the Museum for a conversation with Laytner and Jane Eisner, Director of Academic Affairs at the Graduate School of Journalism at Columbia University and former editor-in-chief of The Forward, about “What They Didn’t Burn.”

Virtual Walking Tour: Jewish Berlin 

Wednesday, October 6, 2021 | 11:00 A.M. ET

(Virtual Event)

Join the Museum and Our Travel Circle for this live, virtual walking tour of one of Berlin’s oldest neighborhoods. There will be an exploration of areas where Berlin’s Jewish community once flourished and explore how its tragic history is being memorialized today.

Led by tour guide Martin, the tour will begin at the Jewish Boy’s School, then head to the oldest Jewish cemetery in Berlin and the neighboring location of the Jewish retirement home. All three sites were seized by the Nazis. There will also be stops at the haunting memorial sculptures by German artist Will Lammert, the New Synagogue built in 1866, and Museum Island—a UNESCO World Heritage Site in the heart of the city.

Introduction to the Holocaust 

Thursday, October 7 – November 4, 2021 | 5:00 P.M. ET

(Virtual Event)

Join the Museum for a virtual adult education course offering an introduction to the Holocaust. The five-part course will meet weekly on Thursdays from 5:00 to 6:30 PM ET. Each class will include a full lecture followed by student Q&A.

The first four sessions will be led by Dr. Avinoam Patt, the Doris and Simon Konover Chair of Judaic Studies and Director of the Center for Judaic Studies and Contemporary Jewish Life at the University of Connecticut. Dr. Patt is a former research scholar at the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum and has published extensively about Jewish life in Europe before, during, and after the Holocaust.

The fifth session will feature Maritza Shelley, a Holocaust survivor from Budapest, Hungary. Shelley survived forced labor and a Nazi death march when she was a teenager. Along with her mother and sister, she eventually escaped, obtained false papers, and hitchhiked back to Budapest with a convoy of Nazis. Shelley emigrated to New York City in 1947.

Wallenberg: A Musical Tribute

Thursday, October 7, 2021 | 7:00 P.M. ET

Edmond J. Safra Hall (In-Person Event)

“Wallenberg,” an epic new musical with book and lyrics by the 2006 Kleban Award-winning team of Laurence Holzman and Felicia Needleman and music by Benjamin Rosenbluth, brings the incredible true story of Raoul Wallenberg, one of the greatest unsung heroes of the 20th century, vividly to life.

In July 1944, the 32-year-old Wallenberg, a businessman from Stockholm, left the safety of neutral Sweden on an American-sponsored mission to Nazi-occupied Hungary. Between face-offs with the notorious Adolf Eichmann and secret dealings with the wife of one of Hungary’s most prominent fascist leaders, Wallenberg saved over 100,000 lives—more than were rescued by any other individual during the Holocaust.

Join the Museum for an evening with the creators and actors behind “Wallenberg,” who will explore the Wallenberg story and perform a set of exhilarating and richly melodic songs from the musical’s score.

Virtual Walking Tour: Jewish Odessa

Sunday, October 10, 2021 | 11:00 A.M. ET

(Virtual Event)

Join the Museum and Our Travel Circle for a virtual stroll through Odessa’s old town and uncover the story of Odessa’s Jewish community.

Tour guide, Olga, will be live on the streets of Odessa sharing her city’s rich Jewish heritage. She’ll showcase sites from the golden age of the city’s Jewish community, focusing on the time from the city’s founding through the 1860s and exploring the identities and motivations of Odessa’s early Jewish settlers.

Attendees will see the Brodsky Synagogue, talk about the powerful Ephrussi family, follow in the footsteps of the prominent Jewish revolutionary Ze’ev Jabotinsky, and see the beautiful mansions that were once home to Jewish merchants in the early 1800s.

Virtual Walking Tour: Jewish Amsterdam

Wednesday, October 13, 2021 | 11:00 A.M. ET

(Virtual Event)

Join the Museum and Our Travel Circle to travel back in time to learn about Amsterdam’s Jewish history on this live, virtual walking tour with tour guide Stephan.

Stephan will explore the city’s historic Jewish Quarter, explaining how Amsterdam became a safe haven for Jews fleeing southern and eastern Europe starting in the 16th century, and why 10% of its population was Jewish at the onset of the Holocaust.

The tour will include stops at the two Amsterdam synagogues and its famed Jewish memorial. Attendees will also see the city’s oldest park, the Hortus Botanicus—a botanical garden established in 1638—and Steohan’s favorite street in Amsterdam. Discover history through a walk along the canals.

Virtual Walking Tour: Jewish Prague

Sunday, October 17, 2021 | 11:00 A.M. ET

(Virtual Event)

Join the Museum and Our Travel Circle to explore the historic Jewish community of Prague, in the Czech Republic.

On this live, virtual walking tour, attendees will learn the history of the Jewish community in Bohemia since the 10th century with our guide Nikola. They will visit several synagogues: the Maisel Synagogue, the Pinkas Synagogue, and the Old New Synagogue—Europe’s oldest synagogue still in use.

The tour will explore the impact of World War II and the German annexation of Czechoslovakia through the Stolpersteine (stumbling stones) and the Terezin Ghetto. Learn the story of Nicholas Winton, the British businessman who saved 669 children with his rescue mission. And finally, attendees will hear the story of the American ambassador’s residence in Prague—the spectacular Petschka Palace.

Love in Wartime

Thursday, November 4, 2021 | 7:00 P.M. ET

(Virtual Event)

Love stories during the Holocaust are as inspiring as they are remarkable. In photographer Max Hirshfeld’s new book Sweet Noise: Love in Wartime, he offers an intimate look at one of these stories through powerful photographs, a series of emotional love letters between his parents, and the narrative of a son’s pilgrimage exploring his origins.

Join the Museum for a program exploring Hirshfeld’s work with the photographer and Jacqueline Kott-Wolle, a fellow artist and daughter of Holocaust survivors. Hirshfeld and Kott-Wolle will explore different forms of love, expression, and the idea that Jewish trauma and hardship did not end after the war.

The Light and Legacy of Rachel Cowan

Thursday, November 4, 2021 | 6:45 P.M.

(In-Person Event)

Rachel Cowan was a civil rights activist, community organizer, the first female Jew by choice ordained as a Rabbi, and a beloved and influential mindfulness teacher. After she was diagnosed with aggressive brain cancer, her years of mindfulness practice enabled her to model living well while dying. Join the Museum of Jewish Heritage and the Institute for Jewish Spirituality, and presenting partners B’nai Jeshurun and the Marlene Meyerson JCC Manhattan, for an evening celebrating the remarkable light and legacy of Rachel’s life.

The program will feature a screening of Dying Doesn’t Feel Like What I’m Doing, a new film about Cowan from American-born, Jerusalem-based documentary filmmaker Paula Weiman-Kelman. The film will be followed by a panel discussion with Weiman-Kelman, Khary Lazarre-White, Executive Director & Co-Founder of the Brotherhood Sister Sol, and Jeannie Blaustein, Founding Board Chair at Reimagine End of Life. The discussion will be moderated by Rabbi Marc Margolius, Senior Program Director at the Institute for Jewish Spirituality.

The Museum of Jewish Heritage – A Living Memorial to the Holocaust is New York’s contribution to the global responsibility to never forget. The Museum is committed to the crucial mission of educating diverse visitors about Jewish life before, during, and after the Holocaust. The third largest Holocaust museum in the world and the second largest in North America, the Museum of Jewish Heritage anchors the southernmost tip of Manhattan, completing the cultural and educational landscape it shares with the Statue of Liberty and Ellis Island.

The Museum of Jewish Heritage maintains a collection of almost 40,000 artifacts, photographs, documentary films, and survivor testimonies and contains classrooms, a 375-seat theater (Edmond J. Safra Hall), special exhibition galleries, a resource center for educators, and a memorial art installation, Garden of Stones, designed by internationally acclaimed sculptor Andy Goldsworthy. The Museum is the home of National Yiddish Theatre Folksbiene.

The Museum receives general operating support from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs and New York State Council on the Arts. 

The Museum is closed on Saturdays, Jewish holidays, and Thanksgiving. 

Museum of Jewish Heritage – A Living Memorial to the Holocaust, 36 Battery Place, New York City, 646-437-4202, mjhnyc.org.

See also:

GROUNDBREAKING EXHIBIT AT MUSEUM OF JEWISH HERITAGE TRANSPORTS TO ‘AUSCHWITZ: NOT LONG AGO. NOT FAR AWAY’

GLOBAL SCAVENGER HUNT TURNS INTO PERSONAL ODYSSEY FOLLOWING ROUTE OF JEWISH DIASPORA (PART 1: Vietnam-Athens)

GLOBAL SCAVENGER HUNT TURNS INTO PERSONAL ODYSSEY FOLLOWING ROUTE OF JEWISH DIASPORA (PART 2: MOROCCO-GIBRALTAR)

GLOBAL SCAVENGER HUNT TURNS INTO PERSONAL ODYSSEY FOLLOWING ROUTE OF JEWISH DIASPORA (PART 3: IBERIA-NYC)

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Machu Picchu and the Golden Empires of Peru Exhibit to Open at Boca Raton Museum of Art Oct 16; Pre-Register for Tickets Now

“Machu Picchu and the Golden Empires of Peru” exhibit opens at the Boca Raton Museum of Art, Florida, October 16. With capacity limited, pre-register for tickets now.

BOCA RATON, Fla. — This fall, South Floridians and tourists from across the globe will discover a culture that thrived in a mythical world thousands of years ago.  World Heritage Exhibitions announced the world premiere of Machu Picchu and the Golden Empires of Peru, opening on October 16, 2021.  The first stop of a worldwide tour will take place at the Boca Raton Museum of ArtCityneon presents the exhibition with support from the Government of Peru, the Peruvian Ministry of Culture, and in partnership with Inkaterra Asociacion.  The artifacts in the exhibition are on loan from Museo Larco in Lima, Peru,  and Museo de Sitio Manuel Chávez Ballón in Aguas Calientes, Peru.

Featuring one of the most impressive Andean gold collections ever to travel the world, this museum experience highlights a stunning  selection of 192 artifacts from royal tombs, including spectacular objects that belonged to noble Andean lords, many never-before-seen out of Peru. One of the exhibition’s highlights is a fully intact gold attire of a Chimú Emperor that dates to 1300 AD.

Machu Picchu and the Golden Empires of Peru showcases the extraordinary and rich history of ancient Peru. It brings to life the various cultures that have lived in the land of the Incas and Machu Picchu over an astounding 3,000 years,” stated President of Museo Larco, Andres Alvarez-Calderon.

“It’s enthralling for Cityneon to have the opportunity to present to new audiences these remarkable pieces of rare Andean artifacts,” said Executive Chairman & Group Chief Executive Officer of Cityneon, Ron Tan. “Cityneon’s strong track record of staging immersive experiences globally with record-breaking visitor numbers reflects our strength in delivering high-quality experiences to visitors from around the world. Through this once-in-a-lifetime exhibition, visitors will have the opportunity to come face-to-face with history in a way that has never been done before. Guests are going to be thrilled to encounter the ancient cultures who lived in this city 7,000 feet above sea level in the Andes Mountains.”

Rivaled only by Ancient Egypt in longevity and by the Roman Empire in engineering, Andean societies dominated a substantial segment of South America for over 3,000 years straight through the reign of the Incan Empire.  Machu Picchu and the Golden Empires of Peru will showcase Peruvian culture’s rich histories and traditions to the public like never before.  

“South Florida, known as the ‘Gateway to Latin America,’ is the ideal location to host this world premiere, and having the opportunity to present this exhibition at the Boca Raton Museum of Art is truly a pleasure,” stated President and Chairman of World Heritage Exhibitions, Anthony Tann. “This exhibition is exciting and engaging, and we expect Machu Picchu and the Golden Empires of Peru to be the largest cultural attraction throughout the region this fall.”

During their visit to the exhibition, guests are taken to the mysterious city in the sky, built and abandoned within a century. They will continue on a journey through the vast expanse of Andean history, traveling alongside the mythical hero Ai Apaec, and discovering the mysteries of Andean cosmology.

Machu Picchu and the Golden Empires of Peru showcases the extraordinary and rich history of ancient Peru. It brings to life the various cultures that have lived in the land of the Incas and Machu Picchu over an astounding 3,000 years,” said President of Museo Larco, Andres Alvarez-Calderon.

Due to the current global pandemic, the need for social distancing, and other measures to prevent the coronavirus spread, the number of visitors allowed to visit Machu Picchu yearly has dropped to 250,000. This exhibition expands the ability to experience Machu Picchu to the world.  Here, the first-ever virtual reality experience of Machu Picchu will be unveiled, allowing guests a window into the unrivaled beauty and flourishing landscape.

“Machu Picchu and the Golden Empires of Peru will allow the stories and riches of Andean civilizations to travel the world,” said Inkaterra Asociacion founder, Joe Koechlin. “We could not be more delighted about sharing our history and culture with the people of South Florida and beyond.” Beginning on October 16, 2021, at the Boca Raton Museum of Art, Machu Picchu and the Golden Empires of Peru will start its limited run in South Florida before leaving the U.S. and embarking on a multi-country, worldwide tour. The state-of-the-art exhibition will encompass the entire museum, including all galleries on both floors. 

Exhibition ticket prices start at $19.95. Tickets will go on sale later this summer.  An online registration process to pre-register for tickets is open.  Those who pre-register will have early access to tickets when they go on sale  to the public. To register to pre-purchase tickets, visit https://bocamuseum.org.


JFK Hyannis Museum on Cape Cod Reopens with ‘Ripple of Hope’ Exhibit Commemorating RFK

The John F. Kennedy Hyannis Museum announced the return of a special exhibit to commemorate the life and legacy of Robert F. Kennedy as it reopens for the 2021 season. Tickets are capacity controlled to adhere to health protocols.

(HYANNIS, MA) –The John F. Kennedy Hyannis Museum announced the return of a special exhibit to commemorate the life and legacy of Robert F. Kennedy as it reopens for the 2021 season. Tickets are capacity controlled to adhere to health protocols.

The “RFK: Ripple of Hope” exhibit, assembled in collaboration with RFK Human Rights Foundation, will open on Saturday, April 17, 2021 at the Hyannis museum and will be on display through 2022.

“The theme ‘Ripple of Hope’ comes from his most famous and powerful speech delivered in Cape Town, South Africa,” said the exhibit curator Rebecca Pierce-Merrick. “It’s a fitting title for our exhibit as well because that’s exactly what his life of public service created ­– a ripple of hope that continues to reverberate through the generations since his passing.”

This exhibit begins with Robert Kennedy’s early years within the Kennedy family, including rarely seen images of his time on Cape Cod. The focal point of the exhibit however, covers his time serving as the U.S. Attorney General, his election to the U.S. Senate, and culminating with his inspirational presidential campaign, which began on March 16, 1968 and ended with his death on June 6, 1968.

One particularly poignant part of the exhibit highlights an impromptu speech he gave before a large group of distraught onlookers the night Martin Luther King, Jr. was assassinated in April 1968 just weeks after Kennedy announced his bid for the presidency.

The exhibit includes 45 images and excerpts from Robert Kennedy’s speeches that convey the boundless energy he showed on the campaign trail, often with Ethel and his children at his side. “Ripple of Hope” also has very moving eight-minute video narrated by Kathleen Kennedy and Joseph P. Kennedy III.

Tickets should be purchased online at www.jfkhyannismuseum.org for specific time of visit as limits are in place for daily admissions for health and safety of museum guests. The Museum will be open daily during April school vacation, and thereafter each Thursday, Friday and Saturday from 11 a.m. until 5 PM until Memorial Day at which time the summer schedule will commence.

The John F. Kennedy Hyannis Museum Foundation preserves and promotes the legacy of President Kennedy, his family, and their deep connection to Cape Cod.

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Happening at New-York Historical Society: Holiday Express Toys and Trains, Last Chance for ‘Bill Graham and the Rock & Roll Revolution’

Last chance! Listen to the music Bill Graham promoted in his concert venues as you go through the tribute exhibit “Bill Graham and the Rock & Roll Revolution“ at the New-York Historical Society, on view through Jan. 3, 2021 © Karen Rubin/goingplacesfarandnear.com

The fabulously popular seasonal Holiday Express: Toys and Trains from the Jerni Collection may be running through Feb.21, but the New-York Historical Society is issuing notice of a last chance to experience the remarkable Bill Graham and the Rock & Roll Revolution (through Jan. 3, 2021), and Women March (through Jan. 24, 2021), plus other events, exhibits, and online and virtual programs.

The New-York Historical Society is open to visitors with timed-entry tickets and safety protocols in place

Here’s what’s on view as well as programs available virtually, on demand, and what is coming up in 2021:

Holiday Express: Toys and Trains from the Jerni Collection

Now through February 21, 2021
A magical wonderland awaits visitors with the return of this holiday tradition. Featuring toy trains, figurines, and miniature models from the renowned Jerni Collection, the exhibition transports young and old alike to a bygone era. The display includes a variety of toy train stations dating from the turn of the 19th century to the WWII era, showcasing the evolving designs of American and European toymakers. Visitors are greeted by animations and fun facts about the toys on nearby screens, and kids will be delighted by a specially created bench inspired by a sleigh in New-York Historical’s collection.

EXHIBITIONS

Bill Graham and the Rock & Roll Revolution
LAST CHANCE: Now through January 3, 2021
The New-York Historical Society presents the rock & roll world of Bill Graham (1931–1991), one of the most influential concert promoters of all time who worked with the biggest names in rock music—including the Grateful Dead, Jimi Hendrix, Santana, and the Rolling Stones. Organized by the Skirball Cultural Center, this comprehensive retrospective of Graham’s life and career explores some of the 20th century’s momentous cultural transformations through the lens of rock & roll. Showcasing more than 300 objects—including rock memorabilia, photographs, and concert posters—the exhibition features a site-specific installation of “The Joshua Light Show,” the trailblazing liquid light show, and a special, immersive audio experience, providing a musical tour through the exhibition with songs by rock superstars Blondie, David Bowie, the Doors, Janis Joplin, and Neil Young, among others.

Women March
LAST CHANCE: Now through January 24, 2021
For as long as there has been a United States, women have organized to shape the nation’s politics and secure their rights as citizens. Their collective action has taken many forms, from abolitionist petitions to industry-wide garment strikes to massive marches for an Equal Rights Amendment. Women March commemorates the centennial of the 19th Amendment—which granted women the right to vote in 1920—as it explores the efforts of a wide range of women to expand American democracy in the centuries before and after the suffrage victory. On view in the Joyce B. Cowin Women’s History Gallery, this immersive exhibition features imagery and video footage of women’s collective action, drawing visitors into a visceral engagement with the struggles that have endured into the 21st century.

Colonists, Citizens, Constitutions: Creating the American Republic
Now through February 7, 2021
America has been singular among nations in fostering a vibrant culture of engagement with constitutional matters and the fundamental principles of government. Featuring 40 books and documents from collector and philanthropist Dorothy Tapper Goldman’s collection—including constitutions from the federal and state levels—Colonists, Citizens, Constitutions: Creating the American Republic depicts the story of America’s unique constitutionalism from the founding era through the turn of the 20th century. The exhibition, which sketches the often troubled history of the country as it expanded across the continent, serves as a timely reminder of our country’s democratic foundations and its relentless quest for improvement.

Dreaming Together: New-York Historical Society and Asia Society Museum
Now through July 25, 2021

As part of the Asia Society TriennialWe Do Not Dream Alone—a multi-venue festival of art, ideas, and innovation—the New-York Historical Society and Asia Society Museum opens their first ever collaborative exhibition, Dreaming Together. More than 35 interwoven works drawn from both art collections generate dialogue about the urban and natural environments, protest and rebellion, individuals and identities, borders and crossings. Highlights include the Canal Street diptych (1992) from Martin Wong’s Chinatown series, 98-foot hanging scrolls by Dinh Q. Lê featuring abstractions of the World Trade Center towers (2016), and a dystopic video narrative of war and destruction by Shiva Ahmadi (2014). The result is a powerful reflection on the possibilities unleashed when people, cultures, and institutions dream in tandem.

Meet the Presidents and the Oval Office
Ongoing

A special permanent gallery on New-York Historical’s fourth floor features a detailed re-creation of the White House Oval Office, where presidents have exercised their powers, duties, and responsibilities since 1909. Visitors to New-York Historical can explore the Oval Office and hear audio recordings of presidential musings. The Meet the Presidents Gallery traces, through artwork and objects, the evolution of the presidency and executive branch and how presidents have interpreted and fulfilled their leadership role. Highlights include the actual Bible used during George Washington’s inauguration in 1789 and a student scrapbook from 1962 chronicling JFK’s leadership during the Cuban Missile Crisis.

New-York Historical’s Permanent Collection Displays 
Ongoing
As the centerpiece of the fourth floor, the Gallery of Tiffany Lamps features 100 illuminated Tiffany lamps from the Museum’s spectacular collection—regarded as one of the world’s largest and most encyclopedic— displayed within a dramatically lit jewel-like space. In the Henry Luce III Center for the Study of American Culture, treasures from our vast permanent collection tell the story of New York and American history. Themed displays present a variety of topics—such as slavery, war, 9/11, and childhood. Highlights include George Washington’s camp cot from Valley Forge; the preparatory model for Alison Saar’s imposing statue Swing Low: Harriet Tubman Memorial; a Venetian blind retrieved from St. Paul’s Churchyard in the days after September 11, 2001; stained glass dating back to 1650 from the time of New Amsterdam; and a draft wheel used in the lottery that sparked the Draft Riots in Civil War-torn New York in July 1863, one of the worst urban riots in American history.

SPECIAL INSTALLATION

The Waldorf Astoria Lobby Clock
Ongoing
Meet us at the clock! The great Waldorf Astoria clock is a legendary part of New York City lore and a meeting spot for generations of New Yorkers. Originally made for the 1893 World’s Columbian Exposition in Chicago, it was crafted in London and features relief portraits of American presidents and Queen Victoria of England. For decades, the towering clock graced the Waldorf Astoria—both at its first location on Fifth Avenue and 34th Street and in the lobby of the hotel’s longtime address at Park Avenue and 50th Street. This time-keeping treasure recently underwent a meticulous restoration and is on view in the Smith Gallery during the hotel’s renovation.

DIGITAL PROGRAMS AND PRESENTATIONS

Bill Graham and the Rock & Roll Revolution Virtual Presentation
Live Online | Tuesday, January 5, 2021 | 4–5:15 pm ET | $10 ($5 for Members)

Dive into the life and times of Bill Graham, the legendary music impresario behind the biggest names in rock & roll—including the Grateful Dead, Jimi Hendrix, Santana, and the Rolling Stones. This interactive presentation on Zoom tells the thrilling story of how a child refugee from Nazi Germany became one of the most influential concert promoters of all time. Explore psychedelic posters, oral history audio clips, and rare backstage photographs with a Museum docent.

The Last Million: Europe’s Displaced Persons from World Warto Cold War with David Nasaw and Judith Shulevitz 
Live Online | Tuesday, January 5, 2021 | 6 pm ET | $20 (Members, $10)

The surrender of Germany to the Allied powers in May 1945 was only the beginning for the millions of people left displaced and homeless in Europe after the war. Exhaustive repatriation efforts settled some, but a million refugees still remained left behind in Germany. Join acclaimed historian David Nasaw live on Zoom as he illuminates the heartbreaking, and sometimes shocking, story of the Last Million as they moved forward into an unknowable future.

Nature and American Art Virtual Presentation
Live Online | Thursday, January 14, 2021 | 3–4 pm | $10 ($5 Members)
Experience the natural beauty of the United States through the eyes of artists in New-York Historical’s collection. Discover how an evolving understanding of science and the emergence of early conservation movements shaped the 19th-century work of naturalist John James Audubon and the landscape painters of the Hudson River School.

The Crooked Path to Abolition: Abraham Lincoln and the Antislavery Constitution with James Oakes and Manisha Sinha
Live Online | Thursday, January 14, 2021 | 6 pm ET | $20 (Members, $10)

The long and turning path to the abolition of American slavery has often been attributed to the ambiguities and inconsistencies of antislavery leaders, including Abraham Lincoln. Live on Zoom, scholars James Oakes and Manisha Sinha uncover Lincoln’s antislavery strategies beginning long before his presidency, ultimately revealing a striking consistency and commitment extending over many years, all centered on the Constitution.

Meet the Presidents: A Look at the American Presidency Virtual Presentation
Live Online | Tuesday, January 19, 2021 | 4–5:15 pm ET | $10 ($5 for Members)

Discover the evolution of the presidency and executive branch and the ways presidents have interpreted and fulfilled their leadership role with exhibition highlights from Meet the Presidents. Notable objects include the actual Bible used during George Washington’s inauguration in 1789 and a student scrapbook from 1962 chronicling John F. Kennedy’s decisions during the Cuban Missile Crisis.

She Came to Slay: The Life and Times of Harriet Tubman with Erica Armstrong Dunbar and Eric Foner 
Live Online | Tuesday, January 19, 2021 | 6 pm ET | $20 (Members, $10)

Harriet Tubman inspired generations of civil rights activists with her heroic work as a conductor on the Underground Railroad. However her extraordinary accomplishments encompass even more. Erica Armstrong Dunbar discusses Harriet Tubman’s full biography, including her advocacy for women’s suffrage, her service in the Union Army during the Civil War, and her experiences as an entrepreneur, nurse, mother, fundraiser, philanthropist, and wife.

The Economy and the President with James Grant and Byron R. Wien 
Live Online | Tuesday, January 26, 2021 | 6 pm ET | $20 (Members, $10)

The coronavirus pandemic has shaken economic foundations across the globe. Following the presidential inauguration, longtime financial observers examine the economic successes and actions of the past few years, explore how the economy influenced the 2020 election, and forecast how the Biden administration’s policies could impact the national economic climate.

Vanguard: How Black Women Broke Barriers, Won the Vote, and Insisted on Equality for All with Martha S. Jones and Eric Foner
Live Online | Thursday, January 28, 2021 | 6 pm ET | $20 (Members, $10)

For many, the suffrage crusade began in Seneca Falls in 1848 and ended with the ratification of the 19th Amendment in 1920. But this overwhelmingly white women’s movement did not win the vote for most Black women. Acclaimed historian Martha S. Jones, in conversation with Eric Foner, recounts how Black women defied both racism and sexism to fight for the ballot from the earliest days of the republic through the passage of the 1965 Voting Rights Act and beyond, and how they wielded political power to secure the equality and dignity of all persons.

PUBLIC PROGRAMS ON-DEMAND

The New-York Historical Society is presenting a rich library of program recordings available to stream on demand. Produced exclusively for New-York Historical, the offerings feature notable speakers. Programs include Julian Fellowes in conversation with Catherine Grace Katz, author of The Daughters of Yalta: The Churchills, Roosevelts, and Harrimans: A Story of Love and War; scholars Akhil Reed Amar and Cristina M. Rodríguez discussing presidential power and immigration law; and a conversation on the life and legacy of Ruth Bader Ginsburg

EDUCATION PROGRAMS FOR STUDENTS, TEACHERS, AND GREEN CARD HOLDERS

History @ Home: Online Learning for Students
Join New-York Historical educators online as they lead live, weekly, interactive U.S. history classes. Lessons are content-based, inquiry-driven, and thematically and developmentally appropriate for each grade served. Students study images, artifacts, and historical documents, and learn to think critically about the history of our nation. All lessons are free. All you need is internet access and a device with the ability to connect to a Zoom meeting. 

Professional Development Workshops for Teachers
Free, one-hour interactive professional workshops take place every Wednesday at 5 pm ET while on Thursdays at 6 pm ET conversations between teachers and a guest scholar are held in an informal setting. 

Citizenship Project: Free Online Citizenship Classes for Green Card Holders
The New-York Historical Society offers free online citizenship classes for green card holders preparing for the naturalization interview. The interactive online naturalization preparation course covers all questions from the USCIS Civics Test. Participants learn about American history and government using objects, paintings, and documents from New-York Historical’s collections through videoconferencing. Online citizenship classes are taught in English and are accessible to English Language Learners. We also offer an online Spanish citizenship class for people who qualify for the English language exemption. New classes begin in January.

ONLINE FAMILY PROGRAMS

The DiMenna Children’s History Museum presents a wide range of digital, interactive family programs for all ages. To learn more about story time and crafts for little ones, conversations with historical interpreters, our Reading into History Family Book Club, and more, visit the Family Programs Calendar. And when visiting the Museum, families can explore the displays with an array of digital family guides

Admission: Adults: $22; Seniors/Educators/Active Military: $17; Students: $13; Children (5–13): $6; Children (4 and under): Free. Pay-as-you-wish Fridays from 6 pm – 8 pm

New-York Historical Society, 170 Central Park West (at 77th Street), New York, NY 10024, www.nyhistory.org, 212-873-3400

See: Many Pathways to Mark Centennial of Women’s Suffrage

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‘Notorious RBG: The Life and Times of Ruth Bader Ginsburg’ Exhibit Coming to New-York Historical Society, Fall 2021

The New-York Historical Society will honor the late Ruth Bader Ginsburg (RBG)—the trailblazing Supreme Court justice and cultural icon—with a special exhibition, Notorious RBG: The Life and Times of Ruth Bader Ginsburg, on view October 1, 2021 – January 23, 2022 © Karen Rubin/goingplacesfarandnear.com

NEW YORK, NY – September 25, 2020 – The New-York Historical Society will honor the late Ruth Bader Ginsburg (RBG)—the trailblazing Supreme Court justice and cultural icon—with a special exhibition next year. On view October 1, 2021 – January 23, 2022, Notorious RBG: The Life and Times of Ruth Bader Ginsburg is based on the popular Tumblr and bestselling book of the same name. A traveling exhibition organized by the Skirball Cultural Center in Los Angeles, the show takes an expansive and engaging look at the justice’s life and work, highlighting her ceaseless efforts to protect civil rights and foster equal opportunity for all Americans.

“We were deeply saddened by the recent passing of Ruth Bader Ginsburg, a native New Yorker whose impact on the lives of contemporary Americans has been extraordinary,” said Dr. Louise Mirrer, president and CEO of the New-York Historical Society. “Justice Ginsburg fought hard to achieve justice and equality for all, inspiring us with her courage and tenacity in upholding our fundamental American ideals. A special friend to New-York Historical, in 2018 she presided over a naturalization ceremony in our auditorium, one of many that we are honored to host annually. The exhibition we had planned as a celebration of Justice Ginsburg’s life will now be our memorial tribute to her achievements and legacy.”

Notorious RBG features archival photographs and documents, historical artifacts, contemporary art, media stations, and gallery interactives spanning RBG’s varied roles as student, wife to Martin “Marty” Ginsburg, mother, lawyer, judge, women’s rights pioneer, and internet phenomenon. Highlights include a robe and jabot from RBG’s Supreme Court wardrobe; the official portraits of RBG and Sandra Day O’Connor—the first two women to serve on the Supreme Court—on loan from the National Portrait Gallery; and listening stations where visitors can hear RBG’s delivery of oral arguments, majority opinions, and forceful dissents in landmark Supreme Court cases.

The exhibition also displays 3D re-imaginations of key places in RBG’s life—such as her childhood Brooklyn apartment; the kitchen in RBG and Marty’s home, with some of Marty’s favorite recipes and cooking utensils; and the Supreme Court bench and the desk in her chambers.

Personal materials range from home movies of RBG with Marty on their honeymoon and in the early years of their marriage to yearbooks from RBG’s academic life—from her Brooklyn high school to Harvard, Columbia, and Rutgers Universities—to a paper that she wrote as an eighth grader exploring the relationship between the Ten Commandments, the Magna Carta, the Bill of Rights, the Declaration of Independence, and the recently formed United Nations Charter.

New-York Historical will announce additional exhibition details and related programming next year.

After debuting at the Skirball Cultural Center in 2018, Notorious RBG: The Life and Times of Ruth Bader Ginsburg has toured the country and is currently on view at the Illinois Holocaust Museum & Education Center, Skokie, IL (February 9, 2020–January 31, 2021) and will travel to the Maltz Museum of Jewish Heritage in Cleveland (February 21–June 20, 2021). After its New York run, the exhibition will travel to the Holocaust Museum Houston in Houston (January 2022); and the Capital Jewish Museum in Washington, D.C. (summer/fall 2022).

The New-York Historical Society presentation of Notorious RBG: The Life and Times of Ruth Bader Ginsburg is sponsored by Northern Trust. Exhibitions at New-York Historical are made possible by Dr. Agnes Hsu-Tang and Oscar Tang, the Saunders Trust for American History, the Seymour Neuman Endowed Fund, the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council, and the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Legislature. WNET is the media sponsor.

The Skirball Cultural Center is a place of meeting guided by the Jewish tradition of welcoming the stranger and inspired by the American democratic ideals of freedom and equality. We welcome people of all communities and generations to participate in cultural experiences that celebrate discovery and hope, foster human connections, and call upon us to help build a more just society. 

The New-York Historical Society, one of America’s preeminent cultural institutions, is dedicated to fostering research and presenting history and art exhibitions and public programs that reveal the dynamism of history and its influence on the world of today. Founded in 1804, New-York Historical has a mission to explore the richly layered history of New York City and State and the country, and to serve as a national forum for the discussion of issues surrounding the making and meaning of history. New-York Historical is also home to the Patricia D. Klingenstein Library, one of the oldest, most distinguished libraries in the nation—and one of only 20 in the United States qualified to be a member of the Independent Research Libraries Association—which contains more than ten million books, pamphlets, maps, newspapers, manuscripts, prints, photographs, and architectural drawings.

The New-York Historical Society is located at 170 Central Park West at Richard Gilder Way (77th Street), New York, NY 10024. Information: (212) 873-3400. Website: nyhistory.org. Follow the museum on social media at @nyhistory on FacebookTwitterInstagramYouTube and Tumblr.

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New-York Historical Society Reopens September 11 With Special World Trade Center Exhibit

The Women March exhibit at the New-York Historical Society, tracing the history of women’s rights during this Centennial Celebration of Women’s Suffrage, has been extended to Jan. 24, 2021 © Karen Rubin/goingplacesfarandnear.com

The New-York Historical Society reopens on Friday, September 11, 2020, with a full slate of exhibitions throughout the building and safety protocols in place for visitors and staff. The three-day opening weekend celebrates New York’s resilience with a special digital installation titled World Trade Center Four Decades: Photographs by Camilo José Vergara, a free virtual public program about 9/11, and joining institutions across the city by lighting up its façade as part of “Tribute in Lights.” The Museum has extended a number of special exhibitions, including Bill Graham and the Rock & Roll RevolutionWomen MarchColonists, Citizens, Constitutions: Creating the American Republic; and The People Count: The Census in the Making of America. 

On display September 11-13, World Trade Center Four Decades: Photographs by Camilo José Vergara showcases more than 40 digital photographs depicting the World Trade Center from the south, east, and west, chronicling its changes over half a century―from the early days of the Twin Towers’ construction in the 1970s, to their dominance of the skyline in the 1980s and 1990s, to the emptiness of the city’s horizon in the aftermath of the tragic events of September 11, 2001, to the slow rebuilding process that followed. On September 11 at 6 pm, a free, online program, History Responds: Pondering the Present, Revisiting the Past, recounts the advent of New-York Historical’s History Responds collecting initiative in the wake of the tragic events of September 11, 2001. The conversation features Valerie Paley, senior vice president and chief historian at New-York Historical and director of the Center for Women’s History; and Kenneth T. Jackson, Barzun Professor Emeritus of History at Columbia University and president emeritus of New-York Historical.

Also on view outdoors in the Museum’s rear courtyard is the free exhibition Hope Wanted: New York City Under Quarantine, which documents the experiences of New Yorkers across the five boroughs during the height of the pandemic. And opening October 23 as part of the Asia Society Triennial: We Do Not Dream Alone—a multi-venue festival of art, ideas, and innovation—New-York Historical and Asia Society Museum present their first ever collaborative exhibition, Dreaming Together, featuring side-by-side pairings from New-York Historical’s American art collection and Asia Society’s contemporary Asian art holdings.

“We are so pleased to once again welcome visitors to the indoor spaces of New-York Historical’s home on Central Park West,” said Dr. Louise Mirrer, president and CEO.  “We have made our building safe through rigorous processes and protocols, and our staff has undergone extensive training to ensure that these safety measures are strictly enforced and respected by all. As the city’s oldest museum, New-York Historical has for 216 years served a vital role in chronicling the city and nation’s history, from New York’s emergence from the ruins of British occupation at the end of the Revolutionary War to the major metropolis the city is today. We are proud to welcome visitors again to engage in and enjoy learning about history, as the city itself comes back to life.”

New-York Historical’s new hours are Fridays, 10 am – 8 pm; and Saturdays and Sundays, 11 am – 5 pm. (Fridays 6 ­– 8 pm are pay-as-you-wish.) Special Member access will be offered every Friday 10 –  11am, and on September Thursdays 11am – 5pm. Seniors and immune-compromised visitors are also welcome on those dates. The DiMenna Children’s History Museum and Audubon’s Birds of America Focus Gallery will remain temporarily closed to visitors. Enhanced sanitizing and cleaning protocols, increased air filtration, and other safety measures have been implemented, and temperature screenings and face coverings are required for entry. Physical distancing will also be enforced: Attendance has been reduced to 25% of typical capacity, and timed-entry tickets can be booked online at nyhistory.org. Additional details about safety protocols can be found at nyhistory.org/safety.

Since New-York Historical closed to the public on March 13 to help contain the spread of COVID-19, it has been actively collecting during these unprecedented times through its History Responds initiative, documenting the pandemic and the Black Lives Matter protests in New York City. For more details on its ongoing collecting efforts and how to donate items, visit nyhistory.org/history-responds.

Exhibitions on View

In addition to permanent exhibitions like the Gallery of Tiffany LampsObjects Tell Stories, and Meet the Presidents and the Oval Office, the following extended, special exhibitions will be on display when the Museum reopens:

·       Bill Graham and the Rock & Roll Revolutionthrough January 3, 2021

·       Women Marchthrough January 24, 2021

·       The People Count: The Census in the Making of Americathrough November 8, 2020

·       Colonists, Citizens, Constitutions: Creating the American Republic, through February 7, 2021

·       In Profile: A Look at Silhouettesthrough November 29, 2020

Outdoor Exhibition: Hope Wanted: New York City Under Quarantine
Curated by writer Kevin Powell and photographer Kay Hickman, Hope Wanted comprises more than 50 photographs by Hickman and 12 audio interviews with the photographs’ subjects conducted by Powell, gathered during the team’s intensive two-day odyssey across the city on April 8–9, 2020. The free exhibition, on display through November 29 in New-York Historical’s rear courtyard (entrance located by 5 West 76th Street between Central Park West and Columbus Avenue), provides an open-air environment for visitors to view the works on display and contemplate the impact of COVID-19 on New York City. The empathetic photographs of New Yorkers and their neighborhoods across all five boroughs and the compelling interviews capture both the tragedy of the pandemic as well as the remarkable resilience of the city and its people.

The New-York Historical Society, one of America’s preeminent cultural institutions, is dedicated to fostering research and presenting history and art exhibitions and public programs that reveal the dynamism of history and its influence on the world of today. Founded in 1804, New-York Historical has a mission to explore the richly layered history of New York City and State and the country, and to serve as a national forum for the discussion of issues surrounding the making and meaning of history. New-York Historical is also home to the Patricia D. Klingenstein Library, one of the oldest, most distinguished libraries in the nation—and one of only 20 in the United States qualified to be a member of the Independent Research Libraries Association—which contains more than three million books, pamphlets, maps, newspapers, manuscripts, prints, photographs, and architectural drawings.

The New-York Historical Society is located at 170 Central Park West at Richard Gilder Way (77th Street), New York, NY 10024. Information: (212) 873-3400. Website: nyhistory.org. Follow the Museum on social media at @nyhistory on FacebookTwitterInstagramYouTube, and Tumblr.

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New-York Historical Society to Open Free Outdoor Exhibition, ‘Hope Wanted: NYC Under Quarantine’ Aug. 14

The New-York Historical Society plans to reopen starting August 14 with a special free outdoor exhibition, ‘Hope Wanted: New York City Under Quarantine.’

New York, NY – The New-York Historical Society, the city’s oldest museum, plans to reopen in stages starting August 14, 2020, pending approval from local and state officials. The Museum will first open a special free outdoor exhibition, Hope Wanted: New York City Under Quarantine, which documents the experiences of New Yorkers across the five boroughs during the height of the pandemic. Then on September 11, 2020, the Museum is planning to reopen indoors, with safety protocols in place for visitors and staff.

“We are eager to welcome visitors back to the New-York Historical Society,” said Dr. Louise Mirrer, president and CEO of the New-York Historical Society. “While so much has changed over the past several months, our mission of ‘Making History Matter’ remains vital, now more than ever before.”

Hope Wanted: New York City Under Quarantine

Curated by writer and humanitarian Kevin Powell and photographer Kay Hickman, Hope Wanted: New York City Under Quarantine features more than 50 photographs taken by Hickman along with 12 audio interviews with the photographs’ subjects conducted by Powell during the team’s intensive two-day odyssey across the city on April 8–9, 2020; the audio will be accessible to visitors through their cell phones. Hickman’s empathetic photographs of people and their neighborhoods in all five boroughs and Powell’s searching interviews of New Yorkers impacted by the crisis capture both tragedy and remarkable resilience at a moment in time during the pandemic. The exhibition text and audio will be offered in both English and Spanish.

Hope Wanted will take place outdoors in New-York Historical’s rear courtyard (located at West 76th Street between Central Park West and Columbus Avenue), providing an open-air environment for visitors to view the exhibition and contemplate the impact of COVID-19 on New York City. Admission is free; access will be limited and face coverings will be required for entry, with social distancing enforced through timed-entry tickets and on-site safety measures.

The exhibition also includes a quiet seating area, surrounded by plantings and conducive to reflection, where visitors can record their own experiences of the pandemic in an open-sided story booth. These oral histories will be archived by New-York Historical.

Kevin Powell is a poet, journalist, public speaker, civil and human rights activist, and the author of 14 books, including his new title, When We Free the World (Apple Books), about the present and future of America, which is exclusively excerpted in the New York Times (“A Letter From Father to Child”). Kay Hickman is a documentary photographer and visual artist. Her passion is highlighting the human experience as it relates to identity, human rights, and health issues. Her work has been featured in the New York TimesTimeVogueMs., VibeUtne, and MFON Women Photographers of the African Diaspora. Dr. Marilyn Kushner, curator and head, Department of Prints, Photographs, and Architectural Collections, is New-York Historical’s curatorial coordinator for the exhibition.

Major support for this exhibition is provided by the Ford Foundation. Exhibitions at New-York Historical are made possible by Dr. Agnes Hsu-Tang and Oscar Tang, the Saunders Trust for American History, the Seymour Neuman Endowed Fund, and the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Legislature. WNET is the media sponsor.

Museum Reopening

Details of the Museum’s indoor reopening protocols and visitor safety measures will be announced soon. Since the New-York Historical Society closed to the public on March 13 to help contain the spread of COVID-19, it has been actively collecting during these unprecedented times through its History Responds initiative, documenting the pandemic and the Black Lives Matter protests in New York City. For more details on what New-York Historical is currently collecting and how to donate objects, visit nyhistory.org/history-responds.

The New-York Historical Society, one of America’s preeminent cultural institutions, is dedicated to fostering research and presenting history and art exhibitions and public programs that reveal the dynamism of history and its influence on the world of today. Founded in 1804, New-York Historical has a mission to explore the richly layered history of New York City and State and the country, and to serve as a national forum for the discussion of issues surrounding the making and meaning of history. New-York Historical is also home to the Patricia D. Klingenstein Library, one of the oldest, most distinguished libraries in the nation—and one of only 20 in the United States qualified to be a member of the Independent Research Libraries Association—which contains more than three million books, pamphlets, maps, newspapers, manuscripts, prints, photographs, and architectural drawings.

The New-York Historical Society is located at 170 Central Park West at Richard Gilder Way (77th Street), New York, NY 10024. Information: (212) 873-3400. Website: nyhistory.org. Follow the Museum on social media at @nyhistory on FacebookTwitterInstagramYouTube, and Tumblr.

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Long Island’s American Airpower Museum Reopens August 1 with Flyovers of WWII Bombers, Fighters

A fly-by of World War II era planes from the American Air Power Museum, Long Island’s only flying military aviation museum, at the popular Jones Beach Air Show. The museum reopens August 1 with a special event featuring flyovers of WWII era bombers and fighters © Karen Rubin/goingplacesfarandnear.com

Farmingdale, NY– The American Airpower Museum, Long Island’s only flying military aviation museum, is mounting a Grand Reopening special event on Saturday, August 1, 2020.  Like all other New York State museums, the American Airpower Museum (AAM) was forced to close due to the Coronavirus outbreak, resulting in the cancellation of half of the Museum’s 2020 flight season.  AAM’s iconic WWII bombers and fighters return to action with an exciting family-friendly flight demonstration.

Join AAM on August 1, at 11:00 a.m., when World War II and other vintage aircraft depart from AAM’s ramp to take to the skies over Long Island’s north and south shores. Aircraft will create camera-ready opportunities as they perform low-level passes over Republic Airport where AAM is based.  These flights will feature AAM’s Grumman TBM Avenger, two North American T6 Texans, the AT28D5 Vietnam era combat fighter, the WACO Biplane and as an added attraction, L-39 cold war era Russian jets.

2020 was slated to be a banner year for AAM.  Museum aircraft were scheduled to participate in historic events marking the 75th anniversary of the end of WWII and honoring U.S. Veterans who made the Allied victory possible.  As they have done for the last 17 years, AAM’s WWII airplanes were going to appear in the Annual Jones Beach Airshow.  And it must be noted that on May 24th 2020, the American Airpower Museum celebrated its 20th anniversary in isolation.

At the end of the 2019 season, AAM took their aircraft “off line” for the winter to begin scheduled maintenance and inspections, making sure the Warbirds would be ready for a full 2020 flight season.  Sometime in early January, the coronavirus outbreak hit our shores.  Public health and safety concerns led AAM’s Board of Directors to preemptively close the Museum on March 16th for two weeks.  “The health and safety of our staff, volunteers and the public was foremost,” said Jeff Clyman, AAM president.  “That’s why we acted early and sent everyone home, causing a total cessation of work on our aircraft,” he added.  Then on March 22nd, New York State ordered all non-essential businesses statewide to close.  Two weeks became three months.

Clyman said it has always been AAM’s mission to honor the legacy of those who gave all to preserve our freedoms.  “We’re pleased to announce we recently resumed maintenance and inspection of our aircraft so that much anticipated flight operations can begin with our grand reopening event.  We also promise a flying salute to our Veterans and front line workers very soon,” he said.  

Admission for adults is $13, seniors and veterans $10 and children $8.  Due to the need for social distancing, admission will be limited to first come/first served.  A maximum attendance of 150 persons will be allowed on the outdoor ramp area, with limited access to the Museum.  All visitors will be required to wear face masks and will have their temperatures digitally taken at the entrance.  As a special promotion, the first 20 people admitted will be included in a raffle for WACO Biplane flights later in the summer (limit one per family).  So bring lunch, hang out and enjoy the AAM experience.

If you are unable to come to the event on Saturday, August 1st,  your can still help AAM offset major financial losses incurred during the Covid-19 shutdown, by using a secure PayPal link at: www.americanairpowermuseum.com/donate/ to make a tax-deductible contribution – any amount is appreciated — or for more information on corporate donations, call Jacky Clyman, AAM executive vice president, at (917) 690-1965 or jacky@cockpitusa.com.

The American Airpower Museum is an aviation museum located on the landmarked former site of Republic Aviationat Republic Airport, Farmingdale, NY.  The Museum maintains a collection of aviation artifacts and an array of aircraft spanning the many years of the aircraft factory’s history.  The Museum is a 501 (c) (3) Nonprofit Educational Foundation.

The American Airpower Museum, Hangar 3, 1230 New Highway, Farmingdale, NY 11735, 631-293-6398, info@americanairpowermuseum.org, www.americanairpowermuseum.com.

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