Tag Archives: hiking

New York State Launches Adopt-a-Trailhead Volunteer Program

Hiking New York’s Adirondacks. NYS has created a new program of trailhead volunteers to assist with the stewardship of trailheads across the state and educate trail users before they enter the backcountry. © Karen Rubin/goingplacesfarandnear.com

New York State has launched a new initiative to assist with the stewardship of trailheads across the state and educate trail users before they enter the backcountry. Introduced in the Governor’s 2021 State of the State address, the Adopt-a-Trailhead program is managed by the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation and gives the public the opportunity to support State-led efforts to care for state lands and educate fellow visitors on the value of responsible recreation.

“Over this last year, we have seen record numbers of New Yorkers and visitors utilizing our world-class trails and natural areas while seeking a break from the stresses of the COVID-19 pandemic,” Governor Andrew Cuomo said. “As New York remains fully committed to making sustained investments in our natural resources and responsibly increasing opportunities for outdoor recreation on state lands, this new program offers an excellent volunteering opportunity for New Yorkers to help the State ensure our trails are ready for the growing number of hikers and visitors.”

In recent years, particularly in 2020 as New Yorkers eagerly pursued safe outdoor recreation experiences during the COVID-19 pandemic, the State has seen an increase in the number of visitors to parks, lands, and trails. Outdoor recreation has been a crucial part of helping New Yorkers stay active, spend time with immediate household and family members, and reduce stress and anxiety. Consistent with the NY Forward phased reopening plan, New Yorkers are encouraged to recreate locally in their region (PDF). Each of the state’s 10 REDC regions have a wide variety of recreational opportunities available for the public to explore and enjoy. While this uptick provides an opportunity for more New Yorkers to explore the state’s scenic natural areas, many of these new users are inexperienced in back-country recreation, leading to mistakes that are potentially harmful to themselves and the environment.  

Adopt-a-Trailhead volunteers will bolster ongoing efforts to eliminate litter problems and educate trail users about hiker preparedness, thus eliminating the amount of trash left at trailheads and encouraging proper disposal of human waste while in the woods. DEC land managers will be identifying trailheads that will benefit most from the new program. Volunteers and DEC will continue to encourage hikers to Hike Smart NY and follow the seven principles of Leave No Trace while hiking. LNT is a set of outdoor ethics developed to educate recreationists on how to best enjoy the outdoors while minimizing their impact. In addition, DEC continues to encourage visitors to the Adirondacks to seek out nearby alternative hikes that provide an experience similar to a High Peaks hike, including great scenic views, but with fewer people.

“New York’s public lands and trails are beloved by thousands of visitors in every corner of the state,” Department of Environmental Conservation Commissioner Basil Seggos said. ”The new Adopt-a-Trailhead program provides New Yorkers who are committed to caring for public lands with the opportunity to help DEC sustain and maintain these natural assets for future generations, as well as for their own enjoyment.”

Introduced in Governor Cuomo’s 2021 State of the State Address, the Adopt-a-Trailhead program is an initiative to enhance opportunities to encourage outdoor recreation and empower volunteers to help maintain trailheads. Groups interested in volunteering for the program should submit an Adopt-a-Trailhead volunteer application to volunteer.stewardship@dec.ny.gov (emailed applications are preferred) or via mail to: NYSDEC, Division of Lands and Forests, Attn: Adopt-a-Trailhead Coordinator, 625 Broadway, 5th Floor, Albany, NY 12233.

After applications are approved, groups and individuals will be assigned to a trailhead in their area. Participation in the Adopt-a-Trailhead program will include:

  • A series of online training courses focused on LNT principles, visitor interaction, and visitor education; 
  • Virtual meetings with DEC program staff to answer questions and share suggestions;
  • Spending time at assigned trailheads during weekend mornings, including holiday weekends and some Friday afternoons, depending on the location; and
  • Monthly reports highlighting statistics such as number of volunteers that participated and number of hours spent at the trailhead.

“Empowering trail users to enjoy natural areas safely and responsibly is exactly what is needed to help ensure these special places aren’t subject to misuse—accidental or otherwise,” New York-New Jersey Trail Conference Executive Director Joshua Howard said. “The Adopt a Trailhead program will allow more visitors to get the one-on-one guidance and education that we have seen to be so effective through our Trail Steward program on the Catskill summits. We are proud supporters of this initiative and the opportunity it presents to share Leave No Trace principles and best practices with the growing number of new and returning visitors to public lands.”

“ADK greatly supports this new statewide Adopt-a-Trailhead volunteer program,” Executive Director of Adirondack Mountain Club Michael Barrett said. “In-person educators at trailheads are a powerful way to both help visitors enjoy the outdoors responsibly and ignite a passion for taking care of public lands well into the future.”

New Yorkers getting outdoors should use common sense in planning outdoor activities because public facilities like restrooms or other amenities may not be available. Use the DECinfo Locator to find DEC-managed resources and visit DEC’s website for more information. DEC continues to remind outdoor enthusiasts to be SMART when recreating this year:

  • Socially distance at least six feet apart;
  • Mask – Wear one when you cannot maintain social distancing, especially in parking lots and along footpaths;
  • Avoid sharing gear when possible;
  • Respect your fellow anglers and the resource by providing space and practicing ethical angling; and
  • Take out what you bring in or place trash in receptacles.

The AAT program supports DEC’s comprehensive and ongoing efforts to sustainably manage increased visitation to public lands and will provide important information to guide future land management decisions. The program also complements recommendations included in the High Peaks Advisory Group’s final report on promoting sustainable recreation in the Adirondack Park. Comprised of stakeholders with expertise in local government, recreation, natural resource protection, business, and tourism, in 2019 the HPAG was tasked with providing DEC with recommendations on how to address critical issues associated with increased public use of High Peaks resources in order to protect these areas in the short and long term, as well as for future generations. Visit the DEC website to read the report.

For more information on the AAT program, visit DEC’s website here.

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REI Focuses on Domestic Outdoor Experiences With Aim to Help 3 Million Get Outdoors Annually; Discontinues International Adventure Trips

Camping in Letchworth State Park, New York. REI Co-op is revising plans for the future of its experiences business with a goal of getting 3 million people outdoors each year through its experiences programs, which will focus exclusively on U.S. domestic adventures. © Karen Rubin/goingplacesfarandnear.com

SEATTLE – REI Co-op is revising plans for the future of its experiences business with a goal of getting 3 million people outdoors each year through its experiences programs, which will focus exclusively on U.S. domestic adventures.

The co-op is investing in an expanded network of experiences close to iconic U.S. outdoor destinations, building on its expertise of small group active travel and local programming currently offered across the nation. REI expects to launch at least 12 new experience centers in the next two years where customers can tap into REI’s guided tours, gear rental and instruction. As part of the announcement, the co-op will discontinue its international adventure travel trips effective May 2021 in order to invest in its domestic travel growth strategy and expand offerings in hiking and camping, backpacking, cycling, women’s only, under-35, family and weekend adventures.

With more than 100 itineraries across the United States, REI adventure travel offers one of the broadest activity assortments of any U.S.-based tour operator. Sales of REI domestic adventure trips have gotten off to a fast start in 2021. As of March, domestic trips were up by 28 percent compared to 2019, making it one the strongest years in adventure travel sales.

“REI is a leader at getting people outside. We’re the only national organization with a wide range of experiences that provide life-changing outdoor moments, whatever someone’s skill level may be,” said Curtis Kopf, who was recently named REI’s chief experience officer. “The co-op’s bold investment in our U.S. experiences will help us welcome more people into the outdoors by making nature more accessible and attainable for everyone.”

A leader with REI since 2018, Kopf’s new role is an evolution of his previous oversight over REI’s experiences and digital divisions. As chief experience officer, he will oversee REI’s acceleration of efforts to design and build differentiated customer experiences that are interconnected across the company in physical locations, digital platforms and hosted experiences.

In recent years, REI annually has helped over 310,000 individuals across the country progress their outdoor interests and explore iconic outdoor destinations like national parks. Beyond multiday adventures, REI also offers fun and educational local experiences in major markets across the country through beginner-to advanced-level classes and guided day tours for hiking, cycling, paddling, climbing and more. REI is a top provider of how to ride a bike classes and wilderness training through its long partnership with the National Outdoor Leadership School (NOLS). The co-op also operates a destination adventure center based in Scottsdale, Arizona with gear rentals, day tours and education for residents and tourists visiting the region.

As REI focuses exclusively on U.S. domestic adventure travel and experiences, the co-op will provide full refunds to any guest who was booked on an international adventure. The co-op’s final international trip will depart in early May. All camping and hiking gear provided by REI to its international vendor network will remain in country for the continued use by individual operators.

REI Co-op

REI is a specialty outdoor retailer, headquartered near Seattle. One of the nation’s largest consumer co-ops, REI is a growing community of more than 19 million members. REI has 168 locations in 39 states and the District of Columbia. If you can’t visit a store, you can shop at REI.comREI Outlet or the REI shopping app. REI isn’t just about gear. Adventurers can take the trip of a lifetime with REI’s active adventure travel company that runs more than 100 itineraries across the country. In many communities where REI has a presence, professionally trained instructors share their expertise by hosting beginner-to advanced-level classes and workshops about a wide range of activities. To build on the infrastructure that makes life outside possible, REI invests millions annually in hundreds of local and national nonprofits that create access to—and steward—the outdoor places that inspire us all.

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New Yorkers Encouraged to Celebrate New Year Outdoors – Responsibly – at State Parks

Hiking in the Adirondacks. New Yorkers are encouraged to celebrate the New Year safely by spending time outdoors this holiday season at state parks, historic sites, wildlife areas, trails, and public lands across the state beginning January 1, 2021. Register for one of the many walks and hikes being held across the state as part of the 10th Annual First Day Hikes program © Karen Rubin/goingplacesfarandnear.com

New Yorkers are encouraged to celebrate the New Year safely by spending time outdoors this holiday season at state parks, historic sites, wildlife areas, trails, and public lands across the state beginning January 1, 2021. Families across the state can register for one of the many walks and hikes being held across the state as part of the 10th Annual First Day Hikes program, a partnership between the New York State Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation and the Department of Environmental Conservation.

“In these challenging times, getting out into nature has been a major outlet for safe and healthy recreation for New Yorkers,” Governor Andrew Cuomo said.”Whether you’re taking a self-guided hike at a favorite park or discovering a new local trail this holiday season, New Yorkers have unparalleled options and destinations to embrace the outdoors this winter and bring in the New Year while remaining COVID safe and COVID smart.”

With the Empire State Trail near completion, residents along the 750-mile route – the longest multi-use state trail in the nation- can enjoy the great outdoors while supporting tourism and community revitalization across the state. Information about the trail, including an interactive map detailing the route, designated parking areas, and nearby attractions is available on the project website.

Walks and hikes are family-friendly, and typically range from one to five miles and are being offered at more than 60 state parks, historic sites, DEC state lands, wildlife areas, Forest Preserve trails and environmental education centers.

A list of New York State First Day Hikes, location details, format, pre-registration requirements and additional information can be found online at parks.ny.gov and dec.ny.gov. Interested participants are encouraged to check the details of their preferred host site and pre-register where required.

Due to the COVID-19 pandemic and requirements for safe outdoor recreation, there will be no large group hikes this year. The event options for hikes range from self-guided treks to staff- or volunteer-led hikes with a limited number of participants. All hikes are subject to regional COVID-19 limitations. Masks or face-coverings are mandatory, and capacity restrictions may limit participation so have some alternate locations in mind. Hikes will span Friday, Saturday or Sunday of January, allowing participants the time and space to social distance while still enjoying nature’s winter wonders.

Here is a list of First Day Hikes by region, along with contact information:

Western New York

Allegany State Park- Red House; 716.354.9101 x.232

DeVeaux Woods State Park, Niagara Falls; 716.282.5154

Evangola State Park, Irving; 716.549.1050

Fort Niagara State Park, Youngstown; 716.282.5154

Genesee Valley Greenway, Hinsdale; 585.493.3614

Genesee Valley Greenway, Cuba; 585.493.3614

Genesee Valley Greenway Snowmobile Ride, Avon; 585.964.3614

Hamlin Beach State Park, Hamlin; 585.964.2462

Knox Farm State Park, East Aurora; 716.549.1050

Letchworth State Park, Castile; 585.493.3680

Niagara Falls State Park, Niagara Falls; 716.282.5154

Plumbottom State Forest, Amity; 585.415.1521

Reinstein Environmental Education Center, Depew; 716.683.5959

Finger Lakes & Central New York

Bowman Lake State Park/McDonough State Forest, Oxford; 607.334.2718

Catharine Valley Trail, Watkins Glen; 607.535.4511

Chenango Valley State Park, Chenango Forks; 607.648.5251

Clark Reservation State Park, Jamesville; 315.415.8377

Delta Lake State Park, Rome; 315.337.4670

Finger Lakes Trail, Naples; 585.727.6495

Finger Lakes Trail Peaceweavers Loop, Naples; 607.227.7957

Fort Ontario State Historic Site, Oswego; 315.343.4711

Glimmerglass State Park, Cooperstown; 607.547.8662

Green Lakes State Park, Fayetteville; 315.637.6111

Herkimer Home State Historic Site, Herkimer; 315.823.0398

Montezuma Audubon Center, Savannah; 315.365.3580

Norwich Greenway North, Norwich; 607.336.4628

Rogers Environmental Education Center, Sherburne; 607.674.4733

Rome Sands Plains Unique Area, Rome; 315.866.6330 ext. 119

Taughannock Falls State Park, Trumansburg; 607.387.7041 ext. 131

North Country/Adirondacks

Goodnow Mountain, Newcomb; 518.582.4551 ext. 104

John Brown Farm State Historic Site, Lake Placid; 518.744.7112

Paul Smith’s College Visitor Interpretive Center, Paul Smith’s, 518-327-6241

Point Au Roche State Park, Plattsburgh; 518.563.6444

Robert G. Wehle State Park, Henderson; 315.938.5302

Sackets Harbor Battlefield State Historic Site, Sackets Harbor; 315.646.2321

Wellesley Island State Park, Fineview; 315.482.2479

Wildway Overlook, Essex, 518.962.2287

Greater Capital District

Five Rivers Environmental Education Area, Delmar; 518.475.0291

Grafton Lakes State Park, Grafton; 518.279.1155 x2

Mine Kill State Park, North Blenheim; 518.827.6111

Moreau Lake State Park, Gansevoort; 518.793.0511

Saratoga Spa State Park, Saratoga Springs; 518.584.2000 x16

Hudson Valley/Catskills

FDR State Park, Yorktown; 914.245.4434

Little Stony Point/Hudson Highlands State Park, Cold Spring; 845.224.7207

John Jay Homestead State Historic Site, Katonah; 914.232.5651

Minnewaska State Park Preserve, Peter’s Kill, Kerhonkson; 845.255.0752

Minnewaska State Park Preserve, Sam’s Point, Cragsmoor; 845.647.7989

North-South Lake, Haines Falls; 518-935-3735

Olana State Historic Site, Hudson; 518.751.0344

Old Croton Aqueduct State Historic Park, Dobbs Ferry; 646.303.1448

Red Hill Fire Tower Trailhead, Denning; 845.256.3083

Rockefeller State Park Preserve, Pleasantville; 914.666.6503

Sterling Forest State Park, Tuxedo; 845.351.5907

Taconic State Park – Copake Falls, Copake Falls; 518.329.3993

Tivoli Bays Wildlife Management Area, Tivoli; 845.625.7198

NYC & Long Island

Bethpage State Park, Farmingdale; 516.249.0701

Clay Pit Ponds State Park Preserve, Staten Island; 718-605-3970 ext. 201

Connetquot River State Park Preserve, Oakdale; 631.581.1005

Cupsogue Beach County Park, Westhampton; 631.444.0450

Jones Beach State Park, Wantagh; 516.785.1600

Hallock Preserve, Wading River; 631-315-5475

Montauk Point State Park, Montauk; 631.668.5000

Mt. Loretto Unique Area, Staten Island; 718.313.8591

Ridge Conservation Area, Ridge; 631.444.0350

Shirley Chisholm State Park, Brooklyn; 212.866.3100

Sunken Meadow State Park, Kings Park; 631.269.4333

“First Day Hikes have grown into a popular tradition for many New Yorkers and we look forward to welcoming families and friends out on the trail at many of our parks and historic sites,” State Parks Commissioner Erik Kulleseid said. “While this year’s program may look a little different from previous events, exploring the outdoors is still the perfect way to enjoy the winter landscapes, unwind with loved ones and kick off the coming year.”

“One unexpected, yet welcome result of the COVID-19 pandemic is the increase in the number of New Yorkers heading outdoors to explore world-class recreational opportunities close to home,” State Department of Environmental Conservation Commissioner Basil Seggos said. “As we get ready to turn the page on 2020 and enter the New Year, DEC and our partners at State Parks are encouraging visitors to keep discovering New York’s abundant lands and parks and to do so safely and responsibly by observing social distancing and other guidelines to ensure an enjoyable and healthy experience for everyone.”

“This year gave New Yorkers a new opportunity to discover the wonders and adventures that await them just outside their doors,” I Love New York Executive Director Ross Levi said. “New York State is not just an amazing destination for visitors; it is a world-class getaway in our own backyard. First Day Hikes and the new year will offer New Yorkers another chance to find what they love here in our own amazing state.”

Get Outside Safely, Responsibly, and Locally

New York State’s PLAY SMART * PLAY SAFE * PLAY LOCAL campaign encourages residents to engage in responsible recreation during the ongoing COVID-19 public health crisis. New York State Parks and the Department of Environmental Conservation recommendations for getting outside safely incorporate guidance from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the New York State Department of Health for reducing the spread of infectious diseases. PLAY SMART * PLAY SAFE * PLAY LOCAL encourages New Yorkers to recreate locally, practice physical distancing, show respect for all outdoor adventurers, and use common sense to protect themselves and others. Wear a mask, even when visiting the outdoors. For more information, visit: https://parks.ny.gov/covid19/

The New York State Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation oversees more than 250 parks, historic sites, recreational trails, golf courses, boat launches and more, which are visited by 77 million people annually. For more information on any of these recreation areas, visit www.parks.ny.gov, download the free NY State Parks Explorer mobile app or call 518.474.0456. Also, connect on FacebookInstagram and Twitter.

See:

Driveable Getaways: Hiking the Hudson River School Art Trail in the Great Northern Catskills

Driveable Adventures: Hiking/Camping in the ‘Grand Canyon of the East’ –NY’s Letchworth State Park

New York’s Empire State Trail Comes Together: Biking the Wallkill Valley Rail Trail in Hudson Valley

Catching the Peak Fall Foliage in New York State’s Adirondack Mountains

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Bike, Hike & Camp Along Grand Canyon North Rim with Escape Adventures

Escape Adventures is offering a family-friendly, 5-day camping and mountain bike adventure that includes riding singletrack to Monument Point, hiking into the canyon on backcountry trails, pedaling across Kaibab Plateau, and conquering Rainbow Rim trail before descending to Indian Hollow.

(Las Vegas, NV) — While most of North America reels under hot summertime temperatures, the North Rim of the Grand Canyon offers a wonderful high-altitude escape. Providing gently rolling terrain of lung-expanding dimensions, the North Rim has been long-held as sacred ground to hikers and cyclists alike. Escape Adventures is offering a family-friendly,  5-day camping and mountain bike adventure that includes riding singletrack to Monument Point, hiking into the canyon on backcountry trails, pedaling across Kaibab Plateau, and conquering Rainbow Rim trail before descending to Indian Hollow. Prices for this adventure start at $1,195 per person and multiple departures are available July 13th through October 4th, 2020. For more info, call 800.596.2953 or visit https://escapeadventures.com/tour/grand-canyon-north-rim-mountain-bike-tour/

“For trekkers and active travelers of all levels, this tour is nothing less than the opportunity of a lifetime,” said Escape Adventures Founder Jared Fisher. “Gazing over the Canyon’s 9,200-ft North Rim, the immediate reaction of our guests runs from fear to reverie, and all agree that the old Arizona and Rainbow Rim Trails are the best ways to experience the Grand Canyon.”

Concealed in big Ponderosa pines and shimmering Aspen groves, the trail through Kaibab National Forest wends to a place that few have visited: the East Rim view. Trails brimming with wildflowers lead riders to exhilarating hikes along the rim. Crossing over to the west side of the plateau, guests camp alongside one of the most scenic mountain bike paths in the world, the Rainbow Rim Trail. It connects five large “Points” of land that overhang the canyon and the Arizona Strip. The five “Points” are Parissawampitts, Fence, Locust, North Timp and Timp.

Escape Adventures selects well-maintained public campgrounds with scenic vistas and comfortable arrangements. Guests will move seamlessly from one day of the trip to the next, enjoying wildly healthy, delicious homemade meals. Most of the campgrounds feature indoor facilities and showers. Conversely, in more remote backcountry camping scenarios, Escape Adventures provides portable toilets and private solar showers.

All internal land expenses and services are covered in the cost of the tour. All transportation, food preparation, meals (except where noted on itineraries), snacks, non-alcoholic beverages, group supplies and community gear (portable chairs, large awnings, coolers, utensils, etc.) are included. Backcountry permits, licenses, park fees, reservations, and accommodations are also included, along with at least two professionally trained trip leaders, a mobile first aid and mechanic station, spare bikes, and a support vehicle(s). Trip price does not include airfare, lodging prior to trip start or bicycle rental and/or camping gear unless otherwise noted on itinerary or website.

Daily Itinerary:

Day 1-2: Meet in St. George. Shuttle to Kaibab Lodge then ride singletrack to alpine East Rim camp for two nights. Ride to Monument Point, short hike into the Grand Canyon on backcountry hiking trail.

Day 3-4: Ride across Kaibab Plateau to beautiful backcountry camp on the Rim for two nights. Ride the Rainbow Rim singletrack.

Day 5: Descend to Indian Hollow on the west side of the Plateau to spectacular vista. Shuttle back to St. George.

Since 1992, Escape Adventures has lead adventure travel vacations through some of the most awe-inspiring natural destinations in the world. Building on over 100 destinations, Escape Adventures caters to the full spectrum of active traveler, respective to fitness level and activity type, from road cyclist to mountain biker to electric biker, hiker, and multi-sport enthusiast, and from first timer to friends and family groups of all ability levels. https://escapeadventures.com/

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Backroads Offers Selection of Spring Break Family Adventures, from Florida to Costa Rica to Hawaii

Visiting the Butterfly Sanctuary in Key West. Backroads is offering a series of family adventures to places from the Florida Keys and Everglades, to Costa Rica, to Hawaii © 2016 Karen Rubin/news-photos-features.com
Visiting the Butterfly Sanctuary in Key West. Backroads is offering a series of family adventures to places from the Florida Keys and Everglades, to Costa Rica, to Hawaii © 2016 Karen Rubin/news-photos-features.com

BERKELEY, CA –Backroads, a leading active travel company, has just introduced a slew of spring break trips for the whole family, ranging from Florida’s Key West and the Everglades to Hawaii’s Big Island, Costa Rica, Palm Springs and beyond. The all-inclusive family adventures offer a perfect blend of activity choices for all ages including biking, hiking, kayaking, cultural exploration, great food and unlimited opportunities for adventure.

Backroads makes traveling easy for families by handling all of the planning and logistics and making booking a breeze. Families traveling with Backroads find it easier to engage with the destination, with everything taken care of, there is less family tension and as kids unplug from their electronics opportunities for interaction abound. Each itinerary balances quality time together and apart, with welcome opportunities for everyone to take a break and recharge—usually impossible on a family vacation.

“Spring break is an ideal time to embark on a family adventure. Many of our destinations are not as crowded as in the summer and the school break is a welcome respite for busy kids and their parents,” said Backroads Founder and President, Tom Hale. “Because we take care of all the details, families can fully relax and enjoy their time together, and even book last minute knowing we have reservations at the popular hotspots.”

Some of the most popular family trips planned for spring break 2016 include:

California’s Palm Springs & Joshua Tree Bike Tour (new in 2016), March 28-31:
Bike on quiet roads amid gravity-defying rock formations and Joshua trees, rock climbing, pool time at luxury hotels, bird watching, hiking and more.

Everglades to Key West Family Multisport Adventure Tour (March 6-11, March 20-25, March 27 – April 1): Winter sunshine in America’s Caribbean – biking, walking & hiking, kayaking, snorkeling, glass-bottom boat rides, history, culture and relaxation

Hawaii’s Big Island Family Multisport Adventure Tour (March 13-18, March 20-25, March 27-April 1, April 3-8): Big-Time Fun on the Big Island from Coast to Crater

Costa Rica Family Multisport Adventure Tour (Family Breakaway and Family departures), April 4-8: From Arenal Volcano to the Pristine Pacific Coast

Santa Barbara & Ojai Valley Family Bike Tour (April 4-8): Rolling Waves and Rolling Hills on California’s Coast

Ecuador: Galapagos & Andes Multisport Adventure Tour (March 20-27):Ancient Culture & Wondrous Wildlife in Ecuador’s Islands & Highlands

Caribbean Family Adventure Multisport Tour (new in 2016), March 21-26 and April 4-9: Beaches, Rain Forest and Volcanoes on Nevis & St. Kitts

Argentina’s Lake District Family Multisport Adventure Tour (new in 2016), March 20-27: National Parks & Epicurean Delights in Patagonia

Belize and Guatemala Family Multisport Adventure Tour (March 13-19, March 20-26, March 27- April 2): Jungles, Maya Temples & The Barrier Reef

More information about Backroads’ family adventures is at www.backroads.com/award-winning-tours/family.

Backroads was founded in 1979 by Tom Hale and has been in business for more than 37 years. The company hosts thousands of guests, 80% of whom are repeat guests or referrals from past guests, in hundreds of locations across the globe. Backroads was named one of the top 100 places to work by Outside magazine in 2015, and is a founding member of the Adventure Collection. For more information, visit www.backroads.com or call 800-462-2848.

 

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‘Get Outdoors Responsibly’: Subaru/Leave No Trace Traveling Trainers Offer Tips to Preserve Natural Landscape

'Get Muddy' say The Subaru/Leave No Trace Traveling Trainers: A giant mud puddle in the middle of your trail? Get muddy and walk right though it to avoid trampling and the loss of important plants and small trees living along our trails © 2014 Karen Rubin/news-photos-features.com
‘Get Muddy’ say The Subaru/Leave No Trace Traveling Trainers: A giant mud puddle in the middle of your trail? Get muddy and walk right though it to avoid trampling and the loss of important plants and small trees living along our trails © 2014 Karen Rubin/news-photos-features.com

Summer is winding down but there’s still time to celebrate summer’s final days in the outdoors with park picnics, road trips, camping, water sports, hiking and much more. Americans logged 1.6 billion visits to national and state park lands last year. The Subaru/Leave No Trace Traveling Trainers encourage people to get outside and enjoy America’s parks, forests, lakes and oceans responsibly during the last few weeks of summer.

The Subaru/Leave No Trace Traveling Trainers are teams educators that travel throughout the United States in their Subaru hybrids and reach millions of people each year. They conduct hands-on educational trainings and outreach, teaching the public about Leave No Trace principles while promoting stewardship of the outdoors, protection and preservation of our public lands and support of outdoor recreational activities.

“The best way to celebrate the end of summer is to get outside,” according to Subaru/Leave No Trace Traveling Trainer, Dani Rowland. “With the growing number of visitors on our public lands, it’s easy for these natural areas to be negatively impacted. The teams travel the country teaching straight-forward skills to help people protect the outdoor places they cherish. Learning and practicing Leave No Trace goes hand-in-hand with your end of summer celebration.”

These five, new tips from the Subaru/Leave No Trace Traveling Trainers to help you Leave No Trace on your next picnic, camp outing or park visit are easy to implement and will help protect our nation’s favorite natural lands for years to come:

 

1. Keep Wildlife Wild

Human food is unhealthy for all wildlife and feeding them can have unfortunate consequences such as drawing them to people and roads and making them sick.

 

2. Get Muddy

A giant mud puddle in the middle of your trail? Get muddy and walk right though it to avoid trampling and the loss of important plants and small trees living along our trails.

 

3. Be Careful With Fire

Burn all wood to ash and be sure the fire is completely out and cold before you leave to avoid starting a wildfire.

 

4. Trash: A Burning Issue

Burning trash and leftover food in your campfire attracts animals and releasing harmful chemicals into the air. Put all leftover food and trash in a trashcan.

 

5. Water Wisdom

Keep soap, food and human and pet waste out of lakes and streams to keep them clean. We all depend on clean water.

 

To learn more tips on Leave No Trace and when the Subaru/Leave No Trace Traveling Trainers will be in your area visit www.LNT.org.

Subaru has a long history of supporting active lifestyle enthusiasts and the organizations that are important to them. In 1999, Subaru of America and the Leave No Trace Center for Outdoor Ethics joined forces to promote responsible recreation across the United States. The Subaru/Leave No Trace Traveling Trainer program consists of four teams of two educators that travel across the country in their Subaru hybrids teaching people how to protect and enjoy the outdoors responsibly. The Subaru/Leave No Trace Traveling Trainers work with the general public, volunteers, nonprofit organizations, friends groups and governmental agencies to reduce the impact of recreational activities in selected endangered areas.  In 2014, alone, the Subaru/Leave No Trace Traveling Trainers will reach 15 million Americans.

Leave No Trace is a national, nonprofit organization that is dedicated to protecting the outdoors by teaching people how to enjoy it responsibly. Since 1994, Leave No Trace has been the most widely accepted outdoors program used on public lands in the United States. Through targeted education, research, outreach, volunteerism and partnerships, Leave No Trace ensures the long-term health of our natural world. Their Subaru/Leave No Trace Traveling Trainers are mobile teams educators that visit 48 states every year delivering Leave No Trace programs. Leave No Trace has mobilized more than 30,000 volunteers to provide outreach and training impacting more than 22 million people annually in the U.S. For more information visit www.lnt.org.

 

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